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and around tax time i get very upset when i'm being questioned in a very inhumane way. so if i use many drivers license, i'm okay. when i pop a sierra leone passport, all of a sudden big problem. i'm the same guy, same people at the same area. it's almost like there's no human interaction at all. and if you try valid information from people for security reasons, you can actually get more than if you're inhumane to them. so it's always quite fascinating to see what the reaction is. every time i enter, i came back from geneva that every time i come back ims questions, but i find the questions incredibly funny. one of them was that i just arrived in the guy asked me, so where were you? is a geneva. he said how long? at the two, days. why reengineered a short time? i only had a few days to do my work. why? i don't know, this is how it was. while you're traveling with a small but? because i was gone for two, three days. but through my backpack and when you travel so many places? because of my work. eventually i say is that there were 10 years, it was like where? would be done in the question
are delighted to have david joining us this afternoon to talk about his new book catastrophic care how american healthcare killed my father and how to fix it. i think that there is -- when i think about health care i think of to challenges i think the conservatives have had on health care. the first is it tends to be little to criticize and critique the health care system because of the march and injured population and the response is than to say while the health care system is just fine. it's the best health care system the world. don't mess with it. don't change it. i think the second blind spot of conservatives in general the certainly in health care is the we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically or with charts and data and they are important, but a lot of times the way the liberals have one arguments is by talking about the single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her or the child is born with cystic fibrosis and the child cannot get health insurance. these are real challenges in the system. there are other challenges for p
in the u.s. capitol, and like all tourists, the very first thing i did when i came to washington, d.c. was to take a tour of the national mall. but when i got there i noticed something. if you just came to washington, d.c., and just went to the national, you almost believe african-americans never lived in the city. i went from one end of the mall to the other from the capitol all the way down to the lincoln memorial looking for the african-american history of washington, d.c.. and i could barely find anything. i said to myself that can't be true. i know there's african-american history in the city. it has to be african-american history of the national mall. maybe no one has bothered to sit and find out what it is and that's how this book came about. starting in the u.s. capitol, i needed my goal to find out what the african-american history of the national mall and this book is the result. i'm going to take a few minutes here today to talk about some of the things i discovered not only about the national mall, but about washington, d.c. as a city. some things i open interest you and
chrystal discusses his memoir, "my share of the task." in the book the former commander of u.s. forces in afghanistan recounts the major turning points in his 34-year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> well, thank you very much. thanks for coming out. i think this is a wonderful opportunity. the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. [laughter] for anyone who is, pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs, you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily, in our intelligence community, in many ways to meet the challenge of this new enemy. and more than anyone that i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping that evolution and developing the what i call the targeting engine which is what we have, i think, adopted as our primary method of defending the country. so thank you for being here, general mcchrystal. the great to see you. >> thanks, mark. thanks for a too-kind introduction. i always thought of you as a nonfiction writer, but you're free to g
and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was appointed by the florida governor jeb bush and charlie crist to serve on the statewide board. both sue and chuck serve on the board of directors of the council of american ambassadors. she's a deval graduate of stanford while we can't claim him as an ally, he's a longtime member and past chairman of the board of the univer
. the policy of our country, foreign policy, all the instruments of power it that you use to frame a policy must be driven with some higher purpose. i mentioned purpose, we lost purpose. we have been about ricocheting crisis to crisis. there's no strategic thinking, hasn't been strategic thinking for a long time in our foreign policy. it is the point i keep making. so does dick lugar who is one of the most accomplished foreign policy thinkers in the country as i do joe biden, one of the best. they talked about this for years. you must frame a strategic context first and then you frame the policy to fit the strategic context, the national interest of your country. what john bose. millennium john's account. that was one of the more creative things we have done. it is bigger than that. until we get a president that does that, then is able to implement, by the way in partnership with the congress, doesn't mean the congress has to agree with everything but you can't treat article i of the constitution like it is an appendix, like it is a nuisance. if for no other reason you can't sustain a forei
by letting us on facebook at facebook.com/booktv or follow us on twitter @booktv. you can also visit our website, booktv.org, and click on news about books. you're watching c-span2, politics and public affairs weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. weeknights what's key public policy events in every weekend the lettuce nonfiction authors and books on book tv. you can see past programs and their schedules that our website at, and you could join in the conversation on social media sites. and now, taylor branch, author of the multi it volume of america in the king year's presents his thoughts on key moments in the civil rights movement. this is about an hour 15 spirited. >> thank you, mr. hale. thank you, atlanta. atlanta history center. i have been heretofore. and glad to be back. i am glad to be back talking about something that has been a subject that has been due to me my whole life and is inescapable now . i'm getting older, is my life's work a lamb glad for it. this is another round. i beg to take more questions tonight than i normally do. i am going to try to sell some
with steel. that's a carnegie kids. we used cars powered that will, it will rockefeller built them is the financial system and consuming is built on a system developed and created by people at pulitzer. pulitzer came to the united states and unearthing the soldiers and they went to europe and he didn't really see any action. like many veterans after the war he was on foot, often afterwards hard to integrate people into the economy. he ends up in st. louis greek becomes befriended by a major who becomes a senator from missouri this newspaper publisher. pulitzer enters the road. within five years of his dreamy night state companies elected state legislature to stare. it's that kind of speed of immigration 19th century when people would come in. to become successful in a really short in the story, in st. louis, inventing a new form of journalism. pulitzer is the modern-day surfer. if you go to a beach and look at on the water cannot be on with the waves are breaking the cnn in winning paddling was there for us, one of them paddles extraordinary speed and because they perceive the undu
just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, personal friend of bill's, like everyone in this room is. and so when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about to lessons of debt crises and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot, what we needed to the will to do. so we were able to convince them. so no i'm not talking to you about this -- talking to you as his friend but his publisher. we had this decision. we were going to do this book, and we did. the ink was that even dry when henry kissinger came out and said, this is a must-read for anybody in any section at any level of the finance industry. no sooner did he do that than paul volcker came out and what to make a comment about how this is a must read. it is a must rea
churchill used to persuade world leaders to don't his position on various matters. it's about forty minutes. [inaudible conversations] good evening. thank you for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book "dinner with churchill: policy-making at the dinner table." since my book is all about the importance and dinners be assuredly not make you late for your own dinners. i will be brief. i want to whet your appetite so you'll buy my book. you want to -- i have lived with wrurnlg winston churchill for four years. it was wonderful. even though it took place in churchill college. i'm asked where i got the idea to add to the thousand already written. i have read many books about the man and notice many of the important accomplishments were achieved at dinners. sometimes at luncheons. so i began to wonder why that was so. why most of the deals that were struck at the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made at or facilitated by dinners at which the leaders were more relaxed in a formal session. so i began digging in to the churchill archives. not do
come in experiment of government, that all of us are in this together in a shrinking world, and in the long run and how we relate to korean communities in indonesia and communities and that is a strength for us. that bill was passed in 1965, and i guarantee you not one person in 100 who studies the civil rights movement understands that it is a third pillar, to build a structure that in the long run will be a great not only strength for america but a great inspiration. not because diversity is nice but because diversity is essential in the world that is shrinking. you have to learn how to get along with one another. we are unconscious to a lot of these things that are consequences of the freedoms set in motion by this movement that struggled for years like dr. king said, we're not there yet, we've got to take more risks, got to go to jail. and he finally ended segregation, gets the nobel prize analyst at said let's have chicken dinners on the nobel prize for 20 years and he said no, we've got to go. in the week is back in jail again. the mountaintop is nice but the valley c
prize winner passed away. that reflects the power of that price, a century still honoring people using pulitzer same. it does something that shares of the nobel peace prize. if you look carefully, nobel peace prizes given to people in danger, for democracy trying to bring about peace and dangerous place like northern ireland. the reason the price is given because you're not going to go and fascinate somebody who just won the nobel peace prize. it's bringing world attention. the most significant pulitzer prize is the one for public service been given to newspapers daringly covering something the community didn't want them to cover. the journalists are ostracized, the local towns often pull out their advertisements and the newspaper's right about some lame it could be a scandal, but the community doesn't want to hear about it. when i got the pulitzer prize, it's a recognition, national recognition and in a sense provides the same umbrella of protection to people who are daring. >> postservice and extraordinarily significant person who still to this day affects our lives. jessica child ma
and the shaping of a region". thank you for joining us, jeffrey macris. >> is there a nonfiction author or book you would like to see featured? send us an e-mail at the tv at c-span.org or tweak us at twitter.com/booktv. now on booktv, john allison argues that government incentives and regulation caused the 2008 claps and says that to improve the economy, we need to opt pure free-market policies. it is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it is a pleasure to be here. i would like to congratulate heritage on the success that they have had. we did it. this is a pattern we have going forward and the purpose is to talk about my book, which is "the financial crisis and the free market cure." people ask me my i wrote the book. the basic answer is i thought it would be interesting to have somebody who knew what he was talking about write about thinking. because if you look to the academics to some degree, they don't know what they are talking about. [laughter] i think it's very important to undo a myth. these myths become destructive. the method they created is that it was caused by the deregul
, global is affecting us. the less of it we have less -- the more we can become an urban society, the more we can do to solve these problems that are at the center of our challenges as a nation. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> now on booktv, for the next african bruce levine examines the effect the civil war had on the south political, economic, and social structures. >> thank you. i hope you'll all be patient while i set up my regalia here. thank you all for coming out this evening. and without further ado let me get right into this. decades after the civil war ended, katherine stone, then you see on the screen, published her memoirs of which she called the gate, busy life that she and her wealthy slaveowning family had fled on their 1200-acre plantation in prewar louisiana. the members of her family, she recalled, these are her words, there was always something going on, formal dining, spend a day, evening parties, fox hunts, and to assist with these and other diversions, katherine added, her family had come again her words, quite a core of serpents to k
by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when henry kissinger came out and sai
billion u.s., ten trillion yen, 2.2% of gdp. a lot of that would go to infrastructure, a lot to the north to the earthquake area, but, of course, we've seen 14 such packages since the late 1990s. and this one has to be different. and also he's pressing the bank of japan. last time i was here was to introduce governor shirakawa several years ago who i think is a very good governor of one of the major central banks in the world, pressing him to put in more monetary stimulus which i think is necessary. but i, one of the points that was made right in this room several years ago by governor shirakawa, and i've been with him three times in the last two months, is, you know, monetary and fiscal stimulus aren't enough n. the case of japan, you need major deregulation. i think major structural reforms, deregulation in the service area. so, hopefully, that'll all flow into the package of the new prime minister. certainly, a tough job -- it's a tough job, but this is the world's third largest economy, and if we don't get japan moving with some of the other problems with europe, etc., i think the wor
. it was a story about him getting put up in a swank new york hotel and he got lost. i've used a hatchet to blaze a trail so he would know how to get back. this is who lincoln has to go up against. [laughter] he is actually very successful. he has the biggest majority in the district, bigger than baker's majority and hardin's majority, now he has a gear and half until he is sworn in. so he continues to go to court, he continues to try these cases and handle cases. the last case that he handles before he heads to washington is a slave case. this is going to be very important when we see where the wilderness act. so there was a slave in the illinois courts, she was trying to bring him back to kentucky. his entire life he is exposed to slavery. he was born in kentucky, which was basically america's first highly if this is something that is very familiar to him. he sees the biggest slave market in north america and he sees the brutality of of slavery and he wishes it would end, but he also recognizes that there are laws in place. and so he represented mr. madsen. you would never see something like th
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17